Category Archives: Photo Tips

Don’t Let Bad Weather Keep Your Camera Tucked Away

Here in the northern hemisphere, it’s winter. And where I am right now – it’s very winter. Miserable stuff that snow. Except when you have a camera in your hand. Then it’s a playground. The landscape takes on a very different look, colours become monochrome, crystals form, fog moves in on cat’s paws (to quote […]

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Add More Color with Black and White – Part 2

(Continued from part 1) Adding Interest to a Photo Album Not all photos need to be in color when they are included in a photo book. In order to add interest and age to a digital photo album, the photos can be a mix of color and black and white photos. In addition, the aforementioned […]

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Add More Color with Black and White

Ansel Adams brought the beauty of the American West through the lens of his camera to the American people. He captured landscapes and scenes that were foreign to many who had never ventured out of a city in their lives. His favorite spot was the wilderness surrounding Yosemite National Park in California, and his favorite […]

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Some tips for landscape photography

Been seeing a lot of landscape photography by some very enthusiastic photographers. There’s some great photography being created. However, I do often see a few common issues that can be corrected. Crooked Horizon Lines: Because of nature (as in bent trees, poles that are actually falling over); or the nature of wide angle lenses – […]

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Where to focus your camera

Quite often it is best to focus on your intended subject (and if its a person, on their eyes), then hold the focus and recompose the image to make the composition stronger – like having your subject to one side or the other rather than dead center. Most modern dSLR’s have multiple focus points available […]

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Bathroom 100

This is a great exercise to push your ability to find interesting compositions anywhere. Go into the bathroom, lock the door and take 100 photos of the bathroom itself. The first 30 or so are easy. By the time you’re done, you’ll find yourself looking at a lot of things a bit different.

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